The 5 Best Archery Gloves

archery gloves

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Archery, like any sport or activity, can be pretty tough at first. Holding the bow wrong, improper grip, poor fitting equipment—any number of factors can contribute to poor archery performance. There is only way to overcome all this. Like the maxim says, practice makes perfect.

Practice, practice, practice. Unfortunately, extended archery practice can bring a little wear and tear on the archer’s body. Archers either use manual release or a mechanical release. Manual release means the archer holds the bowstring with three fingers directly and pulls the string back with his fingers. Then, to fire the arrow, the archer simply straightens his three fingers.

The manual release method can cause a lot of damage to the fingertips, both from holding the bowstring under tension, and from the snap of the bowstring as the arrow fires. Archery gloves are often used to protect the fingertips from this damage.


Neet Suede Shooting Glove, LG

The glove has an adjustable loop the fits around the wrist or around the forearm just below the wrist. It may be adjustable with Velcro or with a small buckle. The loop has material covering the back of the hand that connects it to the fingers.

Some archery gloves have material covering the entire back of the first three fingers; others may just have a small strand. But all archery gloves have closed fingertips.

Neet is a well-known manufacturer of archery gloves. Their most popular model is the Neet Suede shooting glove. It’s a classic design.

The suede material is pretty unique to the Neet brand. It’s supposed to be softer on the hands and does not stick as much when the hand is covered in sweat. Leather is known to stick when it gets wet or sweaty. The Neet Suede glove is also very “sensitive”, meaning that the archer can feel the bowstring better than in leather or synthetic gloves.

The Neet Suede glove has a pretty standard design. It has a suede Velcro loop that attaches it to the forearm right below the wrist. The back of the hand is a thin strand of synthetic material, which makes the glove more breathable.

The entire back of the fingers is covered and the suede tips run about halfway down the inside of the fingers. It’s available in small, medium, large, or extra large, and tends to run a little smaller than other brands. It can be worn on either hand.


Damascus DWC Archery Shooting Glove, Three Finger Design Fits Either Hand, Velcro Strap, Large

Damascus is another big name in archery products. The Damascus DWC Archery glove is a bulky, black leather glove that looks tactical and offers a lot of protection. It’s made of a pretty heavy leather, meaning it really provides the hand a lot of protection.

At the same time, leather is not breathable, meaning it may get a little sticky if the hand gets sweaty. The glove covers the entire back of the hand and the entire backside and palmside of the fingers. This glove is really a great choice for someone who shoots a lot.

It’s a very durable glove, available in four sizes (small, medium, large, and extra large). The glove can be worn on either hand.


October Mountain Products Traditional Shooters Glove Large

he October Mountains Traditional glove is similar to the DWC in some aspects. It’s made of tough brown leather and can withstand years of heavy archery use. The glove has a full finger (the leather covers the entire finger).

The back of the hand is a narrow strip of leather, so it’s more breathable than a full-hand leather glove would be.

October Mountains gloves are handcrafted so you can expect a quality product that will last for years. The handstitching is not only durable, but also quite attractive. It’s available in small, medium, or large, and can be worn on either hand.


Allen Company Super Comfort Saddlecloth 3 Finger Archery Glove (Large)

The Allen Supercomfort Saddlecloth 3 is a more minimalist archery glove. It has leather fingertips but has a thin strap that runs down the back of the hand made of saddlecloth, and then it has a normal Velcro loop around the wrist. The back of the hand is very thin, so the glove should be very breathable and comfortable.

Also, some archers claim that the less material on the backside and wrist of the glove means the glove does not “pull” on the fingertips. Again, this makes the glove more comfortable and reduces finger fatigue. The glove can be worn on either hand and is available in small, medium, or large. It tends to run a little large.


DARK ARCHER TACTICAL ARCHERY GLOVE* (Men’s XL)

The Dark Archer Tactical glove is a very unique archery glove. Where most gloves are made of leather, suede, or some similar cloth, and is stitched together, the Tactical glove is completely seamless. The glove is molded, rather than stitched together. That means it will stretch as much. Eventually, seams tend to wear out and the stitching comes loose—that’s not a problem with the Dark Archer Tactical glove.

​The glove is made of a proprietary latex rubber that is supposed to be the most sensitive glove material on the market. The archer can feel the bowstring almost the same as if he had no gloves on at all. The molded latex offers a very tight fit with a very thin material so the archer can maintain manual dexterity better than with a thick leather or suede glove. It’s a very lightweight glove but is just as durable as leather or suede.

One thing to keep in mind with the Dark Archer glove is that the manufacturers recommend that the gloves be rubbed down with their Darkfin silicone protectant to keep the material supple and prevent breaking, cracking, or stretching. The glove can be worn on either hand and comes in men’s small, medium, large, or extra large, women’s small or medium, and youth size glove.


Archery gloves look nothing like conventional gloves; in fact, very little of the material actually covers the hand. Instead, an archery glove uses a piece of heavy material (leather, canvas, or other durable flexible material) to cover parts of the arm or hand.

The best thing about archery gloves is that they are never very expensive, even the technically advanced models like the Dark Archer glove. All of the gloves reviewed here cost not a fortune, meaning there’s no reason any serious archer shouldn’t have one to protect their fingertips.